Episodes

Episode 71: Lizard Brain, Wizard Brain

Episode 71: Lizard Brain, Wizard Brain

Rarely in a curriculum while learning, we ask children where they feel their emotions in their own bodies and whether those feeling change as their emotions change. Children who feel safe to tackle challenges, assured that they have the skills they need and are comfortable to seek help when needed, do well in school and life. Though in its early stage, research in contemplative studies and mindfulness practices is beginning to show a promising impact of such training on children’s emotional regulation and self-control.

On today’s podcast school psychologist, Debra A. Krodman-Collins, Ph.D., NSCP, RYT, co-author of S.T.O.P. and Relax; a yoga-based curriculum, will discuss how to use yoga-based self-calming techniques for school-aged children to conquer their primitive lizard brain with the wizardry of executive function. With focused and intentional effort to connect mind and body, one can master the mechanism that governs Executive Function.

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Episode 70: The Invisible Giant

Episode 70: The Invisible Giant

Other than air, what is invisible, omnipresent, affects every single human being and yet is taken for granted? The answer is the cultural norms. They are the unspoken rules of social behaviors and shared conventions that everyone is expected follow, but may be doing so without really connecting it to the WHY.

On today’s podcast, our guest, distinguished university professor and professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, Michele Gelfand, Ph.D., discusses the concept of looser or tighter cultures and how our deep cultural programming shapes our views and informs our implicit understanding of what’s permissible in public versus private settings. In order to achieve goals we aspire, we need strong Executive Function and self-regulation skills that allow us to activate versus inhibit certain decisions and actions. However, without the true understanding of the social or cultural context or the understanding of social conventions, one might fail to comply because of having failed to code-switch.

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Episode 69: Examining the Struggle

Episode 69: Examining the Struggle

One shouldn’t be discouraged by the fact that learning is full of struggles as these struggles are inherent to the process of gathering facts, acquiring new knowledge, and gaining vivid insights. However, the struggles that go beyond a certain threshold built into learning should be examined and responded to. On today’s podcast, author, life-long learner, and experienced educator,  Kathleen Kryza, discusses the relationship between student struggles and the incorporation of brain-based differentiated instruction and cooperative learning to elevate the learner experience.

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Episode 68: From Flux to Flow

Episode 68: From Flux to Flow

Life is complicated and we all are doing the best we can to manage its inherently challenging nature and predictably unpredictable flow. Developmental disorders like ADHD, and mental disorders like anxiety and depression, further exaggerate this uncertainty and creates a permanent state of flux.  On today’s podcast our guest, Dr. Mark Bertin, a developmental pediatrician and an author of multiple books, talks about best ways to understand ADHD and augment care through the lens of mindfulness. Such approach allows children and parents with ADHD to see things as they are; just with more clarity. ADHD and Executive Dysfunction are synonymous entities and the management approach leads to greater success if it is rooted in compassion and human wisdom. There cannot be a better guide to survival than that!

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Big Picture 3: Those Who Think Together, Stay Strong Together

Big Picture 3: Those Who Think Together, Stay Strong Together

You might be great at problem solving but the true test of executive function proficiency is not just helping someone get their car out of a ditch, but applying those same skills and principles to help yourself and get your own car out of a ditch. The process of self-directed learning is gradual and insidious where the individual gathers knowledge through experiential learning and subconsciously assimilates and integrates ideas to bounce back.

In this big-picture episode, Sucheta discusses how parents can guide children to develop the self-directed thinking, which has a self-help component to it, so that they can survive everyday roadblocks, set-backs and disappointments and “MacGyver” through everyday problems.

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Episode 67: Why is There No Glitter on the Floor?

Episode 67: Why is There No Glitter on the Floor?

Learning is magical but not every teacher is a magician! Astronaut Scott Kelly celebrated for his curiosity for space missions, struggled to find his footing in the midst of “dull and boring” high school years. More than ever before, distracted, disengaged, and disillusioned kids finding themselves stuck in the ever widening gap between a ”ready to learn” mindset and a “ready to be inspired” mindset.

On today’s episode, Dr. Judy Willis, a board-certified neurologist and a former classroom teacher, shares her passion that integrates neuroscience research regarding learning and the brain to galvanize the educators to let the glitter spill all over their classroom floor. By reintegrating effective and practical ideas into teaching, Dr. Willis believes every teacher can sprinkle magic dust that unleashes one’s inner zeal for discovery.

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Episode 66: Do You Have a Learning Strategy?

Episode 66: Do You Have a Learning Strategy?

When learning, why is it that people often use the most exactly ill-fitted strategies or fail to appreciate the ones that do work? An educator who assumes the role of parting knowledge without much attention to imparting the wisdom of learning HOW to learn is churning our unenlightened students who could never take charge of their learning and self-knowledge.

On today’s episode, Professor Mark McDaniel returns to discuss the idea of gaining more durable knowledge through effort, problem solving, and rehearsal. Tune in to find out why such processes create life-long effective learning.

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Episode 65: A Bridge to the Real World

Episode 65: A Bridge to the Real World

The charm of entering college camouflages the real invitation to become responsible for yourself by figuring out what you want while taking care of the mundane, yet obligatory tasks of daily student life. The dread of “adulting” is further muddled by having to navigate the world with the unseen layers of executive function challenges that compromise attention, new learning, slower thinking, and goal management, pushing away the dream of joining the workforce and transitioning into successfully adult life.

On today’s episode Mary R.T. Kennedy Ph.D., Professor and Chair at the Communication Sciences and Disorders at Chapman University, discusses the special challenges and the proposed road to recovery for college students after a traumatic brain injury.

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Episode 64: Attention, A Force Multiplier

Episode 64: Attention, A Force Multiplier

We have all done it; followed the GPS blindly and reached the international terminal instead of the domestic one or forgotten to turn off the car lights, leaving them on overnight. The only solution is to pay attention to attention and see how to get it under our conscious control.

On today’s episode, Courtney Stevens, PhD, a developmental cognitive neuroscientist and Associate Professor of Psychology at Willamette University in Portland discusses selective attention and the bearing it has on learning, thinking, and behavior throughout your lifespan. Attention is a gateway to information processing and it’s vital that a connection be made transparent between attention, thinking, and Executive Function.

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Episode 63: When is the right time!

Episode 63: When is the right time!

Well-built Executive Function lends itself to thoughtful decision making and on-point problem solving, advantageous to meeting personal goals. However, the shifting nature of cognitive resources warrants keen attention to making crafty adjustments to our daily schedules to actualize the best results. William James was onto something when he wrote, “The great thing, then, in all education, is to make automatic and habitual, as early as possible, as many useful actions as we can, and to guard against the growing into ways that are likely to be disadvantageous to us, as we should guard against the plague.”

On today’s podcast, we talk with Daniel Pink, the author of six provocative books including his latest book When that challenges the perception that all times of day are created equal. He offers the valuable science behind the world changing idea of “timing”, which if taken seriously can offer insights into an optimally functioning self.

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